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Diva Maria Maria from Amodh, Uttar Pradesh, India from Amodh, Uttar Pradesh, India

Reader Diva Maria Maria from Amodh, Uttar Pradesh, India

Diva Maria Maria from Amodh, Uttar Pradesh, India

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If you are married, you should read this novel!

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Reawakening takes the perspective of one of the female aspects from the first book in the list, The Judas Syndrome. Although I enjoyed the first novel, the second spoke to me more, perhaps because the female protagonist has a kindler, gentler illustration of continuing to rebuild her life in a ruined world. The story follows her and her scion as they edge their practice through some gritty substance... Themes of unearthliness and the deep bring it to a different level. A very satisfying read.

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The aftermath of hurricane Katrina are dark terms for Sookie and her associates. Members of the Shreveport Were pack are being murdered and everything is house up to wolf against wolf unless Sookie can get them to actually talk to each other. With the monster Queen of Louisiana weak and vulnerable, the give is ripe for a bloody takeover by another ruling monster monarch - Navada. Her companion Quinn, the weretiger, is missing, and her ex, Bill, isn't giving up. And Sookie meets an unusual relative she never knew she had, and another who has more in common with her than whole world else: telepathy. Unlike the previous book, All Together Exhausted, and a few of the others - the better ones - in this series, From Exhausted to Poor has no Big Maneuver or cohesive structure to it. There are a few like this in the series, that read more like filler and are lighter on the mystery and action cause. Not that cornucopia doesn't happen here, or that it isn't enjoyable. But it is shorter, and more scattered, which I didn't enjoy as much. It's a book of endings and beginnings, and Sookie is no closer to finding peace and happiness in a sharing tie-up than she's ever been - it almost got me depressed. On the up cause, Eric now remembers everything that happened when he was under the magician's scourge and has taken to calling Sookie "lover" - but I'm no longer sure that he's a real bidder for Sookie. It could where one's heading up being Bill after all. Though really, I don't see how it could work. Sookie is, after all, human, and deserving of a human participant and a inheritance of her own. It'd be sad if she got anything less. But there is the telepathy bee in bonnet, which puts limitations on the relationships she can have with plain ol' children. There was a small development towards the where one's heading of the previous book which was strangely ignored in this one: Sookie found she could hear a monster's assumptions (which would immediately put her survival in pitfall if the vamps found out but was a truly interesting development). Usually Harris is very good about making brief reminders or catch-ups with these maneuver changes, since so much happens in the details, but at least twice Sookie clearly states she can't hear devils' assumptions, with no mention of something that had really freaked her out before. Did I just read too much into it? It's hard to see how.

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I loved Ann-Marie MacDonald's previous softcover, "Give up on Your Popliteals". This only was a disappointment. I stuck with it and forced myself to finish all 800+ beeps, but it was tough. It starts really slow and when the plot finally kicks in it's dark and disturbing. The completion ultimately is more rosy but by then it was too late for me.