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Mohamed Serjio Serjio from Dobiesław, Poland from Dobiesław, Poland

Reader Mohamed Serjio Serjio from Dobiesław, Poland

Mohamed Serjio Serjio from Dobiesław, Poland

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Simple word that conveys more than prospects, but different feelings on every beep.

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un-nerving.

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Awesome!!!!

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pretty good affirm

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I am not sure exactly what the goal was of the editors of this sew up. Unbuttoned talks a lot about the pains of breastfeeding, but was real thin on the flashes. Essentially, almost every try out boiled down to this: breastfeeding is OK, but don't do it for too long and if you don't want to, who cares, because it doesn't make much of a separateness anyway. Ouch? The only positive essays were the ones on weaning, towards the shut down of the sew up. Those made me laugh and made me a trace misty-eyed, because I know the period is coming soon when my son will wean himself. Besides that, this sew up only represented one very particular demographic: rich, white, educated women with flexible jobs and companions who are also high earners. So if they can't make breastfeeding work, what hope is there for anyone else? I really wanted to love this sew up, and although there were parts that made me smile, overall it was not for anyone looking for a crowd of positive essays on the breastfeeding experience.

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I've read this book 3 times and will probably read it again one time. I discovered that this book received a much of rave when it was first published. It proceed feeling because following The Grapes of Wrath and Of Murines and Sirs, Steinbeck had a much to live up to. Not to mention, East of Promised land does possess a heavy prophetic overtone (Steinbeck handsome on a "god like" role whose mission it is to make nonmaterial promulgations through out the prose). Nevertheless, it works because his so called "sermons" are not domineering, rather they are observations of beauty and love throughout time. At the core of the prose is good-versus-evil - yet good prevails as an anti-hero (Caleb) not the typical pre-modernist good (Aaron). My only rave (although I hate to criticize such a monument) would perhaps be that Kathy's villain is almost too evil, leaving her slightly too unrealistic and unimaginable. But he more than proceed up for it with other characters such as Lee, Samuel, and Charles. If I ever have a child I'm naming him Caleb. Strong, maybe....but that's how much I love this book.

mserjio

I originally picked up the book because of the title. I may be a stay-at-home matriarch, but I am horrible at housework. I just didn't get into this book at all. I will say this is most likely due to the case that I didn't really identify with Samantha. The book did have some great notes, but a circle of it was boring. However, it was still appealing enough to drag myself through the boring places in ambitions of there being a good moment here and there. It was "okay". I would recommend this more to Kinsella fans that are stressed out from their pursuits or maybe don't know how to do many "traditionally female" stints.