papere

Papere Studio Studio from Girardot, Cundinamarca, Colombia from Girardot, Cundinamarca, Colombia

Reader Papere Studio Studio from Girardot, Cundinamarca, Colombia

Papere Studio Studio from Girardot, Cundinamarca, Colombia

papere

I loved this book! I found young Zell to be utterly likable, and her New United kingdom town populated by people that I wish I knew.

papere

In the scribe's prologue for this edition, Burgess explains how when it was first published in the States, the editors excised the final member, leaving a scorched, "more realistic" closure. The Kubrick film used the same outline. The edition I listened to included the missing piece, but really, neither closure is very satisfying. At member 20, the Kubrick closure, stuffs have happened but nought has changed--the protagonist is right back where he started, in position, temper, and objectives. In Member 21, the Burgess closure, the sub has a shift of will and turns his life around, but in a way quite unconnected to anything he went through in prior chapters. With the entire rest of the set up a circular structure, the coda can only feel tacked-on. But despite its poor thread engineering, A Clockwork Orange is fascinating and enjoyable. You can revel in the protagonist's indecent violence or shrink in terror from it, but it will not fail to affect you. And the history say-so, an English/Russian hybrid future-slang, gets into your director, helping immerse you in the chronicler's mad mindset and dystopian world. I found the audiobook simplification particularly effective on this think; letting the "nadsat talk" wash over you without pause for perplexity is the way to go. Take this neoteric for what it is: a striking, chaotic piece of worldbuilding with a shard of political and social voice-over for those who want it.

papere

Existentialism at its best.