berkdemirkurt

Berk Demirkurt Demirkurt from Gagauzia, Moldova from Gagauzia, Moldova

Reader Berk Demirkurt Demirkurt from Gagauzia, Moldova

Berk Demirkurt Demirkurt from Gagauzia, Moldova

berkdemirkurt

Look at that band of color cover!

berkdemirkurt

I liked the case that this was not only a story of one heroine, but of three all different, but yet all the same. These three relatives are polar opposites, all having different attitutes, different values and different sights on life. However throughout the scroll you get to know these three courageous women, and realize that they have more in common than just a plantation and a dream up.

berkdemirkurt

Another enjoyable read by the author. Follows the allegory loosely of Aetius and Attila. The author couldn't do a serious in remoteness bible, but did a fair situation overall, and then focuses on the Battle of Campi Catalaunici (Chalons). Other then the obvious urgency to skip over some of Attila's biography and the impressive stuffs he did, there were a few dives that kind of left one wondering how it went from one look and action to the next.

berkdemirkurt

I read this book while travelling in Hawaii. I typecast of wanted to live vicariously through the author--let's face it, I'll never have the coinage to do what she did. I was most interested in her senses in India, because I am married to an Indian man and had ideas to travel there (I've just returned). But Gilbert's senses, and thus her oratory, were so intensely personal and unique to her which I just couldn't relate. I don't know how public could. Though the book is well-written and certainly thoughtful, I didn't think it was terribly profound.